Basic Classical Guitar Method, Book 2 (Book & Cd) Reviews

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  1. J. Janssen says:
    29 of 29 people found the following review helpful:
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    The Snowboarding of classical guitar self instruction, February 21, 2006
    By 
    J. Janssen (San Diego, CA USA) –
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      
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    Amazon Verified Hold(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/175-7427355-7741822', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: Basic Classical Guitar Method, Book 2 (Book & Cd) (Paperback)

    Just like Scott Tennant’s “Pumping Nylon” book and DVD, this series (more about this later) is a different take on the traditional self instructional series from luminaries such as Shearer, Noad, Parkening, et.al. Books 1 & 2 in Tennant’s series roughly approximate the ground covered in book 1 of the others, albeit with less repetitious studies and practice material. The technical basics of culture to play the guitar are briefly covered in Book 1 and it is apparently Tennant’s implied recommendation that you buy “Pumping Nylon” and the Pumping Nylon repertoire books to augment your studies througout. Though significantly more expensive than just purchasing Noad’s two “Solo Guitar” books, Tennant’s approach works just as well.

    After one get’s the basics of first position note reading down the instigator introduces studies from Sor and others to acquaint the student and his fingers with just what’s involved in classical guitar technique. The slim volumes, while certainly not a monetary value, pay dividends in the psychological arena of making ahead of schedule culture more controllable by sinking the complexity of the instructional material and still getting the thoughts across. Most guitar students are instructional book junkies anyway and anything that can lower the intimidation factor, whether one is self taught and tutored by a qualified teacher, is well worth the price of a few more book/cd combos.

    As a matter of fact, my only real criticism of the books (1&2) is that they don’t represent excellent dough value for the amount of material contained in them, particularly when compared to the breadth of material covered in Noad’s brilliant series. But, if it makes the culture process less of a grind and more “fun” then it’s money well spent. And this approach is not to fault Scott Tennant, but rather to place blame if you will, at the foot of the publisher, National Guitar Workshop. Every method they teach incorporates multiple volumes to cover material offered elsewhere in singular, more comprehensive packages, but then again, so does Mel Bay and Hal Leonard. Finally, my only other criticism is that this method series is eventually to incorporate Volumes 3, 4 & 5 which to the best of my knowledge HAVE NOT BEEN PRODUCED YET and my efforts to learn that they will from the publisher have been futile. So buyer beware.

    My information for most beginning classical guitar students would be to buy the brilliant Noad series for classical guitar and invest in a few beginning lessons with a qualified teacher who specialises in classical guitar technique, then choose if you want to continue on your own or prefer the teacher/student relationship. If you choose to self instruct (or self destruct) then Tennant’s series represents a worthwhile investment in user friendly instruction. Just insure the follow on volumes are available or you’ll have to switch horses in mid stream.

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  2. Aaron Wolf says:
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Much worse than you’d expect from Tennant – a poorly printed terrified together book, May 20, 2009
    By 
    Aaron Wolf (Ann Arbor, MI United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

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    Same review I wrote for the edition that includes CD, this is for BOOK 2:

    This is awkward. This book is full of lighthearted dumb jokes and illustrations, and aside from that it is mostly generic stuff, such as a whole set of public domain pieces from Carulli.

    The whole thing is slapdash.
    Chapter 1 is “The rest stroke: friend or foe?” After the dubious claim that player’s naturally do free stroke and it is more “friendly”, Scott goes on to say, “[rest stroke] is the most vital stroke in classical playing, simply because it is not practiced in other fingerpicking styles (with the exception of Flamenco).” Now, it is certainly right that rest stroke is significant to most classical players, but it is certainly not BECAUSE it isn’t used outside of classical (which I’m not so sure about being right anyway). And these books are full of junk like this.
    The final pages have a piece that is really printed in 14 staves with the first 6 stretched (literally STRETCHED, like taking an image in a graphic editor and elongating everything until it looks weird and tall) over an entire page while the next 8 are squished (again, literally squished so that the clarification are really wide and flat) into only half a page!

    The chapter on nails is mainly reproduction of material already published in Pumping Nylon.

    The rest of the very small book offers nothing that can’t be found in better forms elsewhere.

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  3. Anonymous says:
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Much worse than you’d expect from Tennant – Book 2 is a poorly printed terrified together book, May 20, 2009
    By 
    Aaron Wolf (Ann Arbor, MI United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Hold(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/175-7427355-7741822', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: Basic Classical Guitar Method, Book 2 (Book & Cd) (Paperback)

    Regarding BOOK 2:

    This is awkward. This book is full of lighthearted dumb jokes and illustrations, and aside from that it is mostly generic stuff, such as a whole set of public domain pieces from Carulli.

    The whole thing is slapdash.
    Chapter 1 is “The rest stroke: friend or foe?” After the dubious claim that player’s naturally do free stroke and it is more “friendly”, Scott goes on to say, “[rest stroke] is the most vital stroke in classical playing, simply because it is not practiced in other fingerpicking styles (with the exception of Flamenco).” Now, it is certainly right that rest stroke is significant to most classical players, but it is certainly not BECAUSE it isn’t used outside of classical (which I’m not so sure about being right anyway). And these books are full of junk like this.
    The final pages have a piece that is really printed in 14 staves with the first 6 stretched (literally STRETCHED, like taking an image in a graphic editor and elongating everything until it looks weird and tall) over an entire page while the next 8 are squished (again, literally squished so that the clarification are really wide and flat) into only half a page!

    The chapter on nails is mainly reproduction of material already published in Pumping Nylon.

    The rest of the very small book offers nothing that can’t be found in better forms elsewhere.

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