The Guitar

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  1. Joel S. Schneider says:
    32 of 38 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Saffron Burrows Soars, December 2, 2008
    By 
    Joel S. Schneider (San Francisco) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Hold(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/185-5415503-8554229', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: The Guitar (DVD)

    I saw “The Guitar” at a film festival and I was very stirred by the experience. The central character goes through a transformation when confronting her mortality that anyone who’s open to the experience will find incredibly absorbing. Don’t be place off by the talk of going on a spending spree – that is NOT what the film is really about (its not a validation of abandoned materialism) – the buying of material objects is just part of a process that the character, Melody, needs to go through in order to learn what’s vital. For any connoisseur of the gorgeous, talented Saffron Burrows this film is a wonderful gift. She delivers a deeply felt and brilliant routine that dominates the cover in very nearly every scene. Its hard to imagine anyone else being able to liven up this challenging role the way Ms Burrows has – she performs magic. There are whole scenes where she is alone on the cover and has no dialogue and sometimes not even any clothes. Its quite primal. Later she explores her sexuality and discovers more of what she’s been missing and has a lot of fun, too. I don’t want to give too much away but I will state that the film is much like a allegory and has an ending that force startle some – either positively or negatively. Many people will like this film and I can also imagine some disliking it – it depends on your perspective. In my case, I thought about “The Guitar” for days after I saw it – it really resonated.

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  2. T. Johnson says:
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Freedom, August 13, 2009
    By 
    T. Johnson (Portland, OR) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The Guitar (DVD)

    I loved this movie. I felt the whole premise is about what would happen if you were completely freed from the normal boundaries of the day to day planet and you could do anything you wanted – no longer locked into your current real planet situation, no longer concerned with duties and the expectations of anyone around you, no longer contorted to fit into the box you’ve made for yourself in life. The path of the character made perfect sense to me. Saffron Burroughs did a fine job of performing arts, and her beauty is very nearly a kind of poetic element of the film. In many ways the movie was all about healing and restoration, both of the body and the spirit, through the freedom to breathe.

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  3. RMurray847 "afilmcritic.com" says:
    3 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Saffron Burrows gives a nice routine but can’t save a ridiculous script, August 4, 2009
    By 
    RMurray847 “afilmcritic.com” (Albuquerque, NM United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      

    This review is from: The Guitar (DVD)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    Melody Wilder is having a terrible day. First, she finds out that she has one to two months to live. (Apparently, she had been “feeling crappy,” saw a doctor and was diagnosed with inoperable cancer. No behavior is offered to slow the progress, or to make her more comfortable. Just “take the day to arrange your affairs and then come back to see a counselor.” Yeah, right.

    Stunned, Melody makes her way back to her office. She arrives at her cubicle only to be “downsized” by her boss in front of everyone. He hands her a check for 4 weeks severance, shrugs and walks off. Yeah, right.

    Distraught, she calls her “boyfriend” who reluctantly agrees to meet with her. Before she can say anything, he’s trotting out believable, original lines like “I’m feeling trapped. Not me…my lifeforce” and “my therapist thinks I need to get in touch with my inner child.” So she gets dumped unceremoniously by a guy who only speaks in cliches. Yeah, right.

    Melody has nothing in her life, so she contemplates suicide. By happenstance, she sees a half page ad in the New York Times advertising the gorgeous, gorgeous, spacious loft with a river view…but it’s only available for two months rental. So, yeah, right…I guess I’d spend that kind of money advertising to rent a space I only had for two months. Anyway, Melody leaves everything she has except the clothes on her back, empties her financial statement, and proceeds to go into this gorgeous loft (and it IS) and starts to furnish it to her liking using her huge pile of credit cards.

    Finally, the movie seems to get something right. If you were all alone and about to die, it force be a VERY viable choice to just max out your credit cards and indulge. Although I must say that the choices for indulgence that Melody makes aren’t the ones I would make…but to each his/her own. She confines herself entirely to her apartment (in fact, she even tosses her few clothes out the window, and until she gets new ones, struts around quite naked.)

    Eventually, Melody makes friends with her pizza delivery girl and her UPS man. In fact, they all become more than friends…although it is nearly impracticable to see what draws these people together other than pure hedonism. But its all scripted in such a way as to make it all an implausible marvel.

    Melody also remembers how as a childish girl she yearned to own this lovely red electric guitar…so she finally treats herself, and spends hours on end tiresome to learn the instrument. These scenes, though mostly dramatically inert, do generate some emotion…the thought of connecting to music in a way that you very nearly feel surrounded by your body.

    Saffron Burrows is Melody, and she does a very nice job. Were the role mishandled, the movie would have been completely unwatchable. As it is, Burrows dives deep into her character and we frequently see real emotion on her face. It’s the kind of routine that will make casting directors take note of her skills, and perhaps land her some roles worthy of whatever talent she has.

    In THE GUITAR, but, the script writer very nearly utterly lets her down. The final section of the film is utterly, completely ludicrous in a way that very nearly made me groan. Jeanneane Garfalo, as the doctor (in a small part that is really jarring) is forced to utter one of the most disgracefully stupid health check explanations I’ve ever heard in a movie. The movie, when it was all said and done, was mostly just a huge slap to my acumen and to my understanding of how humans really behave.

    If you want to see Saffron Burrows take a huge step as an player (or want to see this chillingly skinny player nude for long stretches), this movie force be for you. Otherwise, dodge it!

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